Day 21 – In Virginia, they – Part 3

I wrote this in twenty minutes. I haven’t read the last one. If the plot differs, revert to latest version (this one) for plot details as I have absolutely no memory other names and locations and something about tomatoes. Which, to be honest, is about as in depth as this story goes.

 

Word count: 585

 

 

She flicked her hair up in a warrior-like way. Jerry gulped at Tanya’s coolness in the heat of the moment. There they were, a few feet underneath the pavement, covered in dirt and surrounded by a zombie-mad family with a penchant for tomato juice.

Why hadn’t his smartphone given him the right direction? Why did he need a coffee so much? Why was the whole human race so fundamentally reliant on technology and caffeine? His inner thoughts and submerged questions of society were bubbling and boiling. Mostly these were capped by a morning bacon roll or a glass of red wine from some Chateau in France. But here he had neither. Here, he had only the dregs of some maniac-inducing tomato juice.

“What are we going to do?” he stuttered, frantically calculating each scenario in his head.

“We’re going to get out of here. Alive,” Tanya replied, now pointlessly trying to prise apart the bars on the window.

“How?”

Tanya glared at him, “Don’t expect me to come up with all the ideas, honey? I’ve been the one trapped in here for weeks!”

“Listen sweetcheeks,” he was impressed by his biting back skills, “I don’t know where the hell I am and if it weren’t for your darn father, I’d been in Ocean City by now.”

“My father? My Father?”

She stepped right up to him, shoving a finger on his chest.

“My father was driven by science and evil. It doesn’t make him a bad person.”

“Just misunderstood?”

She dropped her guard. “You don’t know him… you don’t know anything…”

Tanya kicked the side of the chest and Jerry saw an old black and white photograph escape from the dust. He picked it up.

“Is this him?” he asked, seeing a little girl and her father sitting in a big old tree in a field.

She nodded.

“He’s infected the whole town. Perhaps the villages too, I don’t know. It’s been weeks since I last was outside this basement.”

“How many people is that?”

“Thousands. He has thousands at his control.”

Jerry put an arm on her shoulder, “How come you can control him?”

She lowered her head in shame, “Because I share my father’s genes… not all of them… but some. They follow his orders, and so they – after time – follow mine.”

Jerry tasted sweet fear on his lips. It reminded him of his childhood, the time he’d ridden his first bike.

“We’re going to get out alive, and together,” he reassured her.

From the corner of his eye, he thought she smiled and hug a little tighter.

“What happened to your mother?”

“She died…. Choked on a tomato. Dad went mad after that. He couldn’t see any point. They were growers, you know. That’s what they did. But he stopped growing tomatoes after that day and for twelve years after. That was, until two years ago. I didn’t know what he was doing, I swear, else I would have stopped him. He started growing them again. I was so happy I didn’t think what the test tubes and chemical parcels were for…. I swear…”

She started sobbing.

“There, there,” he comforted her, bring her head closer to his own, “You’ll be alright. We’ll think of a way out of here…”

“Not if I’ve got anything to do with it,” a manic voice echoed in from behind them.

They both turned in horror to see a man standing on the stairs in a white laboratory coat gleaming with the power his fear wielded.

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~ by S.G. Mark on October 28, 2011.

One Response to “Day 21 – In Virginia, they – Part 3”

  1. hehehe

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